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7 Things You Should Stop Saying and Doing to Disabled People

7 Things You Should Stop Saying and Doing to Disabled People

 

“You are so brave!” “I feel sorry for you.” “It must be really tough for you.”

These are just a few of the many patronising things the specially abled are told repeatedly in their everyday lives. Statements like these stem from the widely held perception that if you”re differently abled, you must need someone”s help to perform your daily tasks.

 

Here are the seven things you should never say or do to people who are specially abled:

1. Don”t call them ”˜brave”.

There is a common perception in this world that persons with disabilities have to be brave to survive their ordeal. In the minds of those who believe so, disability is ugly and unattractive. As a result, these people marvel at the differently abled for the wrong reasons, calling them “brave” or “inspiring” ”“ just because they went out shopping on their own.

2. Don”t belittle them with your words.

Some people talk to the specially abled as if they”re children. For instance, when you spot a person with hearing aids, don”t immediately revert to speaking slowly, or worse, like a baby. The struggle is with their hearing, not their comprehension. If need be, they will ask you to speak louder of their accord.

3. Don”t assume that all disabled people look the same.

The society tends to paint people who have things in common with the same brush. This is a problematic mindset. A visually impaired person is not just a cane wielder; a paraplegic is more than just a person on wheels. They don”t all look the same ”“ just as able-bodied people don”t.

4. Don”t ask if there”s something wrong with them.

You wouldn”t ask a stranger their medical history, would you? Why should you then be any different when it comes to the differently abled? It”s an intrusive and unnecessary question; you only need to know what their needs are, not why they have those needs. Besides, if they want you to know, they”ll tell you.

5. Don”t assume that they need your help.

The one thing people should stop doing immediately is assuming that people with special needs are forever in need of their assistance. Be it helping someone alight the metro or serving them food that”s already cut up, such actions are grossly patronising, and can further isolate the afflicted.

6. Don”t give any unsolicited advice.

With a skewed view of things, it is easy to compartmentalise people in a box and offer solutions that are tainted by your perspective. Think twice before dishing out misplaced advice about their health. After all, intentions don”t matter, actions do.

7. Do not define them by their disability.

Perspectives that stem from a lack of understanding or empathy are at best avoidable. When disabilities don”t define the motivations, ambitions and identity of the specially abled amongst us, why should anyone else have this preconception?

Soccer Fever Grips Global Citizens Once Again

Soccer Fever Grips Global Citizens Once Again

With FIFA world cup just around the corner, Soccer fever is on. Fans across 200 countries wait for this moment to cheer for their favorite teams, which seems no less than a festival. With such widespread fan following, India isn’t behind any other Soccer loving nation!

Now that we”ve stated the obvious, let”s shed some light on the amazing facts around Soccer and India.

To begin with, Soccer has been a sport in India for more than 100 years. And you would be amazed to know that Asia”s oldest Soccer club, Mohun Bagan A.C., has its roots in Kolkata.

India is currently at the 97th rank in the FIFA worldwide rankings, and with Sunil Chhetri leading the Indian team, high hopes are pinned on breaking records and setting new ones.

The most played, loved and watched- by- millions sport has left our specially abled children at MBCN awestruck. Overcoming all odds in life, our superstars aced the game like pros. In recent times, our special children have not just won several matches, but have won gazillions of hearts with their sheer dedication and love towards the sport.

Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan”s powerful five player team won the Football State Games that were organised by Special Olympics Bharat – Delhi, at The Tagore International School. Another budding footballer, Praveen Nailwal, has won a gold medal in Unified Football. He was also awarded a sum of ₹62,000 from the Delhi Government as a token of appreciation. Our special children not just make us proud, but inspire us to give our best, overcoming all the difficulties.

We, at The Ponty Chadha Foundation ensure that each child at Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan – a school for the specially abled children, get the opportunity to come out with flying colors.

MBCN Soccer 1

MBCN Soccer 2

Our faculty and highly equipped staff focus on cultivating not just creativity in our specially abled children, but also encourage them to explore their potential and walk on the path of a successful future. We help children with special needs become independent by empowering them and their families with the care they need. At MBCN, we create an environment for optimum quality of life for such kids, their trainees and the families.